Acceptable grounds for refusing a pet application

Pets

A personal approach
to body corporate management

Relationships are the foundation of our business, built on the understanding that every client is unique, not just at a body corporate level, but as individuals.

That’s why we take the time to listen, tailoring our management approach to suit every person, their communication style and business preferences.

Receive an obligation
free proposal

We'll need to get some details about your building. Let us know the best time to contact you.

Pets have long held a special place in our hearts and homes, and while pet ownership was already a right for owners with a body corporate, recent Queensland legislative changes have further extended this right to tenants.

In this article, we cover the very limited reasons a body corporate could reasonably refuse a pet application.

1. If the animal has been declared dangerous or menacing

According to the Brisbane City Council, animals that ‘are involved in a reported incidence may be declared dangerous or menacing under the Queensland Government’s Animal Management (Cats and Dogs) Act 2008.’

Council may declare your dog dangerous if:

  • it has seriously attacked a person or another animal
  • it has acted in a way that caused fear to a person or another animal
  • based on the behaviour of a dog towards a person or another animal, an authorised person forms an opinion that the dog may seriously attack a person or another animal
  • another local government has previously declared the dog dangerous

Council may declare your dog menacing if:

  • it has attacked a person or another animal in way not considered a serious attack
  • based on the behaviour of a dog towards a person or another animal, an authorised person forms an opinion that the dog may attack a person or another animal
  • it has acted in a way that caused fear to a person or another animal

2. If it is a banned dog breed in your local council

Each council will have a list of banned dog breeds listed on its website. An application for one of these dog breeds would be reasonable grounds for a body corporate to refuse the pet application.

3. If it is not considered a domestic pet

While many animals like goats and cows are domesticated, they are not generally considered pets. A body corporate could reasonably refuse an application for animals that are not considered domestic pets like pigs, goats, horses, chickens, cows etc.

4. If there is more than a reasonable number

Again, your local council will provide the number of cats and dogs that can be kept without a permit in their region. A body corporate could reasonably refuse an application if the number of animals exceeded the maximum stipulated by your local council without a permit.

5. If you are looking to run a commercial pet business

If you were looking to run a commercial breeding centre or doggy daycare within the complex, the body corporate could reasonably refuse your application.

6. If the animal was not vaccinated, microchipped and registered with the local council

If proof of vaccination, registration, and microchipping could not be provided by the owner, the body corporate could reasonably refuse an application for this pet.

Every application must be assessed on the merits of the individual pet. The body corporate committee CANNOT refuse a pet application based on:

  • the weight of the animal, even if it is stipulated in the building’s outdated by-laws that dogs must be under 10kg
  • a specific breed unless it is listed on the local council’s website as a banned dog breed
  • the perception that the pet is not suitable for the apartment because it is too big or requires a lot of exercise
  • the assumption that it may bark or cause a nuisance
  • personal preferences against having pets in the complex

Related content

Share This Post

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Is BCsystems your current body corporate manager?
You are

More To Explore

Budgeting
Basics

The basics of body corporate budgeting

Budgeting is a crucial aspect of managing a body corporate, and the key to ensuring funds are correctly allocated to fairly meet the collective needs of all owners. In this article, we look at the basics of body corporate budgeting, including how the budgets are prepared and approved, where and how the money is spent, and what you can do if you believe the budgets and levies are excessive or not enough.

Like this article?

Follow us for more